Allspice

From our list of ailments, see what Allspice can be used for:

  • Appetite Lack of

Natural Remedies using Allspice

The berries from a pepper plant native to Indonesia are used as the spice called cubeb. The dried berries resemble peppercorns both in appearance and taste, but they also have a bit of the flavor of allspice.

Contraindications, Interactions, and Side Effects (Allspice) — Class 1 (AHP). Not covered (KOM). ‘Hazards and/or side effects not known for proper therapeutic dosages” (PH2).

Appetite Lack of

The Benefit of using Allspice as a natural cure

Indications (Allspice) — Arthrosis (1; RIN); Athlete’s Foot (1; AAB); Bacteria (1; APA); Bruise (f; CRC); Candida (1; APA); Cold (f; CRC); Colic (1; APA); Convulsion (1; APA); Corn (f; CRC; JLH); Cramp (1; AAB; APA); Diabetes (f; CRC; JFM); Diarrhea (f; APA); Dysmenorrhea (1; AAB; CRC; JFM); Dyspepsia (f; AAB; APA; CRC); Enterosis (f; APA); Fatigue (1; AAB); Fever (f; JFM); Fungus (1; AAB; APA; CRC); Gas (1; AAB; APA; CRC; JFM);

Dosages (Allspice) — 1–2 tsp herb/cup water 3 ×/day (APA); 4–6 fruits/cup water as stimulant (JFM); 0.5–2 g powdered fruit (PNC); 2–4 ml liquid extract (PNC); 0.05–0.2 ml EO (PNC).

Allspice is heavily used in traditional Caribbean and Middle Eastern dishes where it is used to flavor meat dishes and sausage. In the United States and Great Britain, allspice is popular as a spice for baking and desserts. 

Allspice gets its name from the coincidence that it seems to combine the flavors of cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg. It is derived from the dried berries of a tree that is common in Mexico and Central America.