Calories Burned Running A Mile

Below you will find average calorie burns for ‘How many calories burned doing Running A Mile’, by weight range and how many minutes spent doing it.

Calories Burned Running A Mile 30 Minutes

Calories Burned Running A Mile for 30 minutes

  • Weight 100lb: 40
  • Weight 120lb: 50
  • Weight 125lb: 50
  • Weight 150lb: 60
  • Weight 175lb: 70
  • Weight 200lb: 80
  • Weight 250lb: 90
  • Weight 300lb: 110

Calories Burned Running A Mile 1 Hour

Calories Burned Running A Mile One Hour

  • Weight 100lb: 80
  • Weight 120lb: 90
  • Weight 125lb: 100
  • Weight 150lb: 120
  • Weight 175lb: 140
  • Weight 200lb: 150
  • Weight 250lb: 190
  • Weight 300lb: 220

Calories Burned Running A Mile 20 Minutes

20 Minutes Running A Mile

  • Weight 100lb: 30
  • Weight 120lb: 30
  • Weight 125lb: 30
  • Weight 150lb: 40
  • Weight 175lb: 50
  • Weight 200lb: 50
  • Weight 250lb: 60
  • Weight 300lb: 70

Scroll down for Calories Burned Running A Mile in 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 45 minutes

Calories Burned Tips

  • Snack on Nuts – A recent study found that dieters who snacked on shelled pistachios shed more pounds than those who ate other snacks, even though they contained the same amount of calories.
  • Reduce common stressors – Stress can actually cause the body to metabolize food more slowly, according to research published in the journal Biological Psychiatry. To make matters worse, the food we crave when we’re stressed out tends to be fatty and full of sugar. Researchers say that the combination of high-cal cravings and a stress-induced, snail-paced metabolic rate can result in significant weight gain. To increase your metabolism, fight stress with laughter. Research shows that smiling and laughing causes levels of stress hormones to diminish.
  • Cut back on diet soda and artificial sweeteners – Yeah, yeah, it has zero calories, but drinking diet soda may yet play havoc with your goal of having a flat belly. Research published in the journal Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism shows that artificially sweetened beverages may screw up the body’s normal metabolic response to sugar, actually increasing appetite! Increasingly, diet drinks are being linked to weight gain, metabolic syndrome and a host of other ills. (Find out what happens to your body when you give up soda.)
  • Focus on fiber – Studies show that those who eat the most fiber gain the least weight over time and that eating fiber can decrease your risk of belly fat by 3.7 percent. Aim for about 28 grams of fiber a day – the amount present in about three servings each of fruits and vegetables.
  • Pump Iron – Experts say weight training is the best way to crank up your resting metabolic rate. As you get older, your resting metabolic rate drops, but weight training can rev it right back up again: A pound of muscle burns up to nine times the calories a pound of fat does, explains fitness expert Westcott. In fact, a woman who weighs 130 pounds and is muscular burns more calories than a sedentary 120-pound woman of the same height. Regular strength training can increase your resting metabolic rate anywhere from 6.8 to 7.8 percent. (That means that if you weigh 120 pounds, you could burn around 100 more calories a day, even when you’re just watching TV.)

Calories Burned Running A Mile 10 Minutes

  • Weight 100lb: 10
  • Weight 120lb: 20
  • Weight 125lb: 20
  • Weight 150lb: 20
  • Weight 175lb: 20
  • Weight 200lb: 30
  • Weight 250lb: 30
  • Weight 300lb: 40

Calories Burned Running A Mile 15 Minutes

  • Weight 100lb: 20
  • Weight 120lb: 20
  • Weight 125lb: 20
  • Weight 150lb: 30
  • Weight 175lb: 30
  • Weight 200lb: 40
  • Weight 250lb: 50
  • Weight 300lb: 60

Calories Burned Running A Mile 45 Minutes

  • Weight 100lb: 60
  • Weight 120lb: 70
  • Weight 125lb: 70
  • Weight 150lb: 90
  • Weight 175lb: 100
  • Weight 200lb: 110
  • Weight 250lb: 140
  • Weight 300lb: 170