Eyes

From our list of herbs and spices, the following are recommended for Eyes:

  • Bupleurum Root
  • Carrot
  • Cayenne
  • Chamomile
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Citrus Bioflavonoids
  • Eyebright
  • Ginkgo Biloba
  • Grapeseed
  • Red Raspberry
  • Rutin
  • Spirulina

Natural Cures and Remedies for Eyes

Horseradish is made from the root of a plant that is so ubiquitous its origins have been lost. It is quite pungent and has the power to make the eyes water and the mouth burn.

Due to the severity of bouts of cough, bleeding can occur into the eyes, from the nose, the lung, and , in rare cases, into the brain, resulting in convulsions. In many young children, lung complications such as collapse of a part of the lung are common because of the thick sticky nature of the secretions blocking the passage of air to a part of the lung. Secondary infection may result in pneumonia. They may be convulsions, and, in rare cases, inflammation of the brain.

Bupleurum Root, Carrot, Cayenne, Chamomile, Chrysanthemum, Citrus Bioflavonoids, Eyebright, Ginkgo Biloba, Grapeseed, Red Raspberry, Rutin, Spirulina

Contraindications, Interactions, and Side Effects (Kava) — Class 2b, 2c, 2d. Contraindicated for endogenous depression (AHP). Maximum tolerated doses for dogs was 60 mg/kg, for rats 320 mg/kg StX (70% kavapyrones). Perversely, if the authors didn’t misspeak, the dogs tolerated 24 mg/kg/day. Of >4000 patients taking 105 mg/day StX (70% kavapyrones), 1.5% had objectionable side effects (allergy, dizziness, GI distress, and headache). At levels 100 times the therapeutic dose (roughly 13 liters kava beverage a day or 300–400 mg rhizome per week) caused anorexia, ataxia, dyspnea, hair loss, red eyes, skin rash, visual problems, and yellow skin. ‘There is no potential for physical or psychological dependency. Use should not exceed 3 months.” (AHP) Germans limit use to 1–3 months (AHP). Commission E reports contraindications: esophageal and gastrointestinal stenoses; adverse effects: allergic reactions (rarely). Other sources report intestinal obstruction (AEH). Many reports suggest a yellowing of the skin in chronic users. ‘Chronic ingestion may lead to ‘kawism’ characterized by dry, flaking, discolored skin, and reddened eyes” ( LRNP, May 1987). Persistent rumors suggest that overdoses can cause intoxication. Commission E warns against the concomitant use of kava with barbituates, antidepressant medications, and CNS agents. Lactating or pregnant women should not use kava (WAM). ‘Not permitted as a non-medicinal ingredient in oral use products in Canada” (Michols, 1995). Abuse by Australian Aborigines suggest links to hematuria, infectious disease, neurological abnormalities, pulmonary hypotension, nephrosis, visual disturbances, ischemic heart disease, thrombosis, and sudden heart attacks (MAB). The following quote might scare abusers, as it should, ‘Full consciousness is maintained with even fatal doses” (APA, quoting Weiss, 1988).

Other little-known causes of anaemia are intestinal parasites or worms. Hookworm, pinworms, round worms and tapeworms feed on the blood supply as well as on the vitamins. Twenty-five hookworms can consume fifteen grams of blood every 24 hours; a tapeworm can cause acute shortage of vitamin B12. Symptoms of intestinal worms are itching at the rectum, restlessness at night with bad dreams, diarrhoea, foul breath, dark circles under the eyes and a constant desire for food. Garlic can help get rid of some types of intestinal parasites. Fresh papaya and grated raw carrot are also effective. After successful treatment for intestinal worms, perfect cleanliness should be observed to prevent recurrence.

When one or more of the essential amino acids are left out of the diet, symptoms similar to those of vitamin deficiencies may be experienced such as low blood pressure, anaemia, poor muscle tone, slow heaing of wounds, loss of weight, poor resistance to infections and bloodshot eyes.

Improves vision Many texts report the use of purple loosestrife for any type of vision issues, including cloudiness, reduced vision capability, or injured eyes.