Upset Stomach

From our list of herbs and spices, the following are recommended for Upset Stomach:

  • Anise Seed
  • Artichoke
  • Barberry Root
  • Barley Grass
  • Basil
  • Bay Leaf
  • Bitterwood
  • Blessed Thistle
  • Bromelain
  • Burdock Root
  • Carrot
  • Catnip
  • Celery Seed
  • Chamomile
  • Chicory Root
  • Cilantro Leaf
  • Cumin
  • Dandelion Root
  • Devils Claw
  • Elecampane
  • Fennel Seed
  • Ginger Root
  • Goldenseal Root
  • Green Tea
  • Irish Moss
  • Juniper Berry
  • Kelp
  • Lemon Balm
  • Milk Thistle
  • Muirapauma
  • Myrrh
  • Peppermint Leaf
  • Quassia
  • Rosemary
  • Slippery Elm Bark
  • Soy
  • Spearmint
  • Thyme
  • Wild Yam

Natural Cures and Remedies for Upset Stomach

Devil’s claw (Harpagophytum procumbens) is a traditional southern African herb used to treat pain and upset stomachs. Its name comes from its clawlike fruit, which resemble the feet of birds. Ten clinical studies conducted between 1982 and 2000 have found that devil’s claw can benefit people with rheumatoid arthritis, low back pain, and various other rheumatic complaints.

lead to pain with menstruation and drastic uterine spasms, lower pelvic and back pain, and clotting. Pennyroyal helps to assist the uterus by creating a smooth flow and thinning the uterine lining. Soothes stomach Native Americans used penny-royal to soothe an upset stomach and aid digestion. Reduces fevers For people with sudden and extreme feverish conditions, pennyroyal can help bring on perspiration to reduce fever. Contraindications Should not be taken during pregnancy. Many mistakenly believe that penny-royal can induce abortion, but this is not the function of pennyroyal. Never ingest pennyroyal essential oil or use it topically, because it is toxic and can be lethal.

Anise Seed, Artichoke, Barberry Root, Barley Grass, Basil, Bay Leaf, Bitterwood, Blessed Thistle, Bromelain, Burdock Root, Carrot, Catnip, Celery Seed, Chamomile, Chicory Root, Cilantro Leaf, Cumin, Dandelion Root, Devils Claw, Elecampane, Fennel Seed, Ginger Root, Goldenseal Root, Green Tea, Irish Moss, Juniper Berry, Kelp, Lemon Balm, Milk Thistle, Muirapauma, Myrrh, Peppermint Leaf, Quassia, Rosemary, Slippery Elm Bark, Soy, Spearmint, Thyme, Wild Yam

drops/day as aphrodisiac (JFM). Mom used to give me a half teaspoon of vanilla extract for upset stomach when she was out of Castoria, which also smelled, to me, of vanilla. I thoroughly enjoyed both, perhaps contributing to my latent love for herbal tinctures (hence my book, Living Liqueurs) (JAD).

Chamomile ( Matricaria species) was used as an herbal remedy by the ancient Egyptians and Romans, and the herb’s mild-flavored tea has been recommended for menstrual cramps, stomach pain, indigestion, and fever. The tea, made with a tiny bit of honey, is excellent for treating an upset stomach. Used topically, chamomile poultices, lotions, and creams can have cosmetic and dermatologic benefits as well.

Contraindications, Interactions, and Side Effects (Lemongrass) — Class 2b. Very safe (AHP; JAD). Emmenagogue and uterotonic (AHP). TRAMIL suggest that grass teas be strained to remove fibers that may damage the stomach (TRA). Commission E reports herb and EO not permitted for therapeutic use. Allergic contact dermatosis occurs rarely (AEH). Citronella oil indicated in accidental poisoning of 21-month-old child. Volunteer testing revealed no toxic effects from lemongrass tea prepared from 4 g of plant, administered in a single dose or 2 weeks of daily oral doses. Higher amounts caused upset stomach (10 g) and diarrhea (4 g for 14 days) in volunteers. Polyuria was also reported by some volunteers (AEH). JNU mentions that the geraniol in basil and lemongrass appears to fight cancer. But if I score these two herbs 1 for cancer, then I should score those herbs richer in geraniol.

Anise Seed

Artichoke

Barberry Root

Barley Grass

Basil

Bay Leaf

Bitterwood

Blessed Thistle

Bromelain

Burdock Root

Carrot

Catnip

Celery Seed

Chamomile

Chicory Root

Cilantro Leaf

Cumin

Dandelion Root

Devils Claw

Elecampane

Fennel Seed

Ginger Root

Goldenseal Root

Green Tea

Irish Moss

Juniper Berry

Kelp

Lemon Balm

Milk Thistle

Muirapauma

Myrrh

Peppermint Leaf

Quassia

Rosemary

Slippery Elm Bark

Soy

Spearmint

Thyme

Wild Yam

In the course of research scientists quickly realized that most NSAIDs interfere with both Cox-1 and Cox-2, causing a variety of side effects in many people. The most common side effect of NSAIDs is an upset stomach, which affects at least 10 to 20 percent of people taking these drugs, but according to some studies may affect up to 50 percent. In 10 to 25 percent of people regularly taking NSAIDs, the stomach wall erodes, leading to gastritis (inflammation of the stomach wall) and the formation of gastric ulcers. Ironically, as physicians have successfully treated Helicobacter pylori infections, a major cause of stomach ulcers, NSAIDs have become the leading cause of ulcers. The reason is NSAIDs’ suppression what’s wrong with anti-inflammatory drugs