Wounds

From our list of herbs and spices, the following are recommended for Wounds:

  • Aloe Vera Leaf
  • Barley Grass
  • Black Walnut Hull
  • Boswellia
  • Burdock Root
  • Calendula
  • Cayenne
  • Chamomile
  • Dandelion Root
  • Echinacea Angustifolia
  • Echinacea Purpurea
  • Gotu Kola
  • Kelp
  • Milk Thistle
  • Olive Leaf
  • Oregon Grape Root
  • Red Clover
  • Sarsaparilla
  • Sheep Sorrel
  • Watercress
  • Witch Hazel
  • Yellow Dock Root

Natural Cures and Remedies for Wounds

Arnica is not suitable for internal use as it can be quite toxic, unless it is in a homeopathic form. For the same reason you should not apply it to open wounds and cuts, as too much arnica can then be absorbed into the bloodstream. However, applying the ointment well away from the cut is acceptable: keep a 2-3cm gap between the margin of the cut and the cream application, and apply arnica in a thinner layer than you would to unbroken skin, where it can be applied quite liberally. There is little point in applying arnica to injuries that are more than one day old – arnica is very much a first-aid item that must be applied as soon as possible after the injury to prevent local haemorrhage and swelling.

At one time, medicinal herbs were often grown in home gardens, including simple herbs known for their ability to relieve fever, heal wounds, and treat bites. Herbal remedies were commonplace, and if a person didn’t know the

Aloe Vera Leaf, Barley Grass, Black Walnut Hull, Boswellia, Burdock Root, Calendula, Cayenne, Chamomile, Dandelion Root, Echinacea Angustifolia, Echinacea Purpurea, Gotu Kola, Kelp, Milk Thistle, Olive Leaf, Oregon Grape Root, Red Clover, Sarsaparilla, Sheep Sorrel, Watercress, Witch Hazel, Yellow Dock Root

When one or more of the essential amino acids are left out of the diet, symptoms similar to those of vitamin deficiencies may be experienced such as low blood pressure, anaemia, poor muscle tone, slow heaing of wounds, loss of weight, poor resistance to infections and bloodshot eyes.

Aspirin, specifically, also is a potent anticoagulant, largely because it interferes with chemicals involved in blood clotting. Many physicians recommend a very small amount of aspirin daily to reduce the long-term risk of coronary artery disease. But aspirin’s blood-thinning effect also increases the tendency toward bleeding (such as in nosebleeds) and bleeding time, making wounds slower to close and heal.

Although mostly known as a general immune stimulant, echinacea can be useful in some cases of skin disease as an external application. Native Americans traditionally used it for the treatment of various wounds.

Aloe Vera Leaf

Barley Grass

Black Walnut Hull

Boswellia

Burdock Root

Calendula

Cayenne

Chamomile

Dandelion Root

Echinacea Angustifolia

Echinacea Purpurea

Gotu Kola

Kelp

Milk Thistle

Olive Leaf

Oregon Grape Root

Red Clover

Sarsaparilla

Sheep Sorrel

Watercress

Witch Hazel

Yellow Dock Root

associated with the beneficial effect on asthma. Gel reported effective in mouth ulcers. Gel preparations reported effective against peptic ulcers (unless stress-induced), radiation burns, and skin ulcers, ineffective against stress-induced gastric and peptic ulcers. Healing wounds (10 mg/kg scu rat; 100 mg/kg scu mouse).